Updates from July, 1978 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • gerardoberger 4:58 am on July 18, 1978 Permalink | Reply
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    Pros and Cons of Open Source 2 way radio Software 

    Anyway ladies and gentlemen, i’ve one more brilliant walkie talkie protocol piece of writing to read, i know, you do not need to thank me each and every one, just click a social like to the short article to demonstrate your appreciation.

    When choosing which piece of software to use you usually have the option of using licensed software that you have to pay for, or open source software, which not only do you not have to pay for, but the source code is also made available to you. You may immediately think that, since you do not have to pay for it, open source software is always the way to go, but that is not always the case as, depending on the situation, it may be better to pay the possibly high cost of licensed software for the benefits it has.

    The benefits of open source software are numerous. As just mentioned, the foremost benefit of open source software is that it can be used at no cost to you or your company. All you need to do is download it. One of the other major benefits of open source software is the fact that its source code is freely available to you. This means that if you so desire, you can modify it yourself to make the software work to your liking. This is extremely helpful, as if you need a similar piece of software to one that is offered in the open source community, but that certain piece doesn’t have a feature you need, you can add that feature yourself. Also available is a multitude of ways to receive free support, and view the possibly vast documentation online.

    Open source software does, however, need a dedicated community. The MOTOTRBO two way radio system is open source. I’m not certain what the development community is like for this product. Without one there won’t be enough people to keep the project going on all fronts. If there aren’t enough people working on the software itself, necessary updates will not get out in good time or coding may come completely to a halt.

    Not only do there need to be enough coders, but there also has to be a large and dedicated support community working on the software documentation too. The community needs to be able to constantly update the documentation to match the changes taking place with the software, and make sure it is written well and readily available to users.

    Sometimes though, open source software is not the answer and it is better to go with licensed software, even though you could end up paying hundreds of dollars for it. One of the most obvious cases is if there isn’t an open source equivalent of the software that you need, or if the open source equivalent isn’t quality software. Another reason to choose licensed software over open source is that the open source software just doesn’t contain a feature you need and you don’t have the means or the time to add it in yourself, or it’s just not worth it to do so.

    One other reason is that you need quality technical support for the product. While open source software can have quality support, it is usually quicker and better for licensed products because there is usually a phone line available and a much larger community.

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  • gerardoberger 4:47 pm on July 14, 1978 Permalink | Reply
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    Warrant Man Confesses To Phony Emergency 2 Way Radio Calls 

    Thanks for reading my site, here’s an article i actually enjoyed reading. With their authorization i can repost it. I compose tons of my own articles, but sporadically post other content i find fascinating, thanks for reading.

    As police were closing in, the man charged with interfering with emergency radio transmissions in Litchfield County tried to get rid of the Walkie Talkie he is accused of using by throwing it into a trash container, according to court documents released Monday.

    Several people had contacted police to say they suspected Adam Perrelli, 35, of Great Barrington, Mass., was behind a series of phony radio calls on frequencies used by Litchfield County fire departments and ambulance crews.

    State police had distributed the recordings to the media with the hope that someone would recognize the voice.

    Police said they received several calls that mentioned Perrelli, who has a criminal record, including sexual assault and burglary. Tipsters told police that Perrelli had two-way radios.

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    One witness told state police about Perrelli’s attempt to get rid of the two-way radio, telling them on March 4 that she saw Perrelli throw a backpack into a trash container at a VFW post in Great Barrington on Feb. 28.

    When detectives checked the trash container that same day, it was empty. They then contacted the owner of the carting company that emptied the container and he told them he still had the load from the VFW trash bin in his truck.

    On March 6, detectives followed the refuse truck to a transfer station in Canaan, N.Y., where the load was dumped. They searched the refuse and eventually found a backpack containing a Baofeng two-way radio.

    That same day, Perrelli in an interview with detectives admitted making several of the fake radio transmissions that interfered with fire and ambulance dispatching in Litchfield County in December and January. He claimed to be drunk when he made some of the calls, police said.

    Several people told police that Perrelli had boasted about making the transmissions. They said they contacted police after learning about the allegations.

    The warrant described Perrelli as someone who wanted desperately to be a firefighter, but who failed to gain certifcation in Connecticut and was rejected from joining the Great Barrington fire department.

    Perrelli, who used to live in Branford, was arrested Friday on charges of reporting a false incident, reckless endangerment, computer crimes, interfering with an officer and tampering with physical evidence, state police said. He was arraigned Monday in Superior Court in Litchfield and ordered held on $125,000 bail.

     
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