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  • gerardoberger 7:39 am on September 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    A digital PMR system has revolutionized on-site communications 

    Some of these trained writers on the net are at a really top level that i wonder if any of them have ever created a paperback? well every so often i like to focus on these outstanding articles and here is one i found fascinating the other day.

    The historic brewery where Guinness stout is produced. A day trip to Dublin gave Richard Lambley an opportunity to explore.

    Occupying 63 acres of land on the south side of the Liffey, the St James’s Gate Brewery, home of Guinness, has been a part of Dublin’s history for more than 250 years. Crammed into this site, not far from the city centre, are some 52 buildings ancient and
    modern. Representing the gradual evolution of production methods as new facilities have been established over the years and older ones have fallen into disuse, they range from elegant eighteenth-century offices, laboratories and warehouse buildings to modern glass and
    steel structures, including facilities such as modern experimental brewery. There’s even an underground reservoir. For the general public, the big attraction is the Guinness Storehouse, a visitor centre dedicated to the history and making of the famous
    dark brew. Its seven storeys, modelled inside in the shape of a giant pint glass, are topped by a gallery offering spectacular views across the brewery site and the city itself. In the working part of the brewery, on-site
    communications are provided by a Kenwood Nexedge digital PMR system. This equipment, replacing an earlier analogue installation, is the work of the Dublin-based PMR A digital PMR system has revolutionized on-site communications at Ireland’s
    most celebrated industrial location – the historic brewery where Guinness stout is produced. A day trip to Dublin gave Richard Lambley an opportunity to explore Dark secrets supplier BP Multipage – whose customer,
    both at the brewery and at other Irish sites operated by Guinness’s owner, the drinks giant Diageo, is the security company G4S. “We look after their interests in relation to PMR”, explains Philip Pratt, of BP Multipage.
    “They’ve come up with a number of different projects that we’ve worked with them on, and we also look after their own equipment. They have a mixture of various different manufacturers’ equipment. In the main it would be
    Kenwood, because we are the distributors here in Ireland for Kenwood. But we also import Motorola products.”

    On the Guinness brewery site, the Nexedge system supports some 55 radios, from a mobile installed in the private ambulance to the handportables carried by security staff and maintenance workers. These are managed
    from a central control room at the brewery, where we meet Darragh McNicholas, contract services manager for G4S. Darragh points to a map on the wall which shows the complexity of the crowded site, hinting of fearsome radio
    coverage problems. The site is sliced through by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to link the two parts. “At the moment you’re standing here”, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger.
    “There’s a fire station up here and you came in at this gate over here. We have a whole other “Product comes in up here and it’s roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here”, he continues,
    his finger tracing paths across the map. “Then it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground to the fermentation plant down here. And that’s our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is
    exported all over the world for canning.” On the control desk, twin screens display the status of 2 Way Radios connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors
    behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently in use on the radio system.

    Kenwood’s dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard – and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick method of exchanging updates without tying
    up the radio channel. In addition, the software records a complete activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the
    screen, indicating the number of the person who is in trouble. The microphone on the calling Walkie Talkie will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh
    received a compelling reminder of the critical importance of communications when a fire at the lager plant damaged the old radio system. “When that happened, power was shut off”, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which
    once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside he recalls. “It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didn’t survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication,
    and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view. “Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and there’s liquid, which radio signals don’t like.”
    What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was simply for a good system. “We had a good look around to see what was out there and what was the best fit for us”, he explains.
    “And we were willing to spend the money on it. But there was all the additional stuff that it would give us – the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to
    tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and that sort of thing.”

    Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required. But even on its own, the digital radio system
    at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darragh’s opinion. “It’s savage, it’s by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to link the two parts.
    “At the moment you’re standing here”, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger. “There’s a fire station up here and you came in at this gate over here. We have a whole other site on the other side of the road.
    “Product comes in up here and it’s roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here”, he continues, his finger tracing paths across the map. “Then it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground
    to the fermentation plant down here. And that’s our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is exported all over the world for canning.” On the control desk, twin screens display
    the status of radios connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently
    in use on the 2 way radio system. Kenwood’s dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard – and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick
    method of exchanging updates without tying up the radio channel.

    In addition, the software records a complete activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the screen, indicating the number of the person
    who is in trouble. The microphone on the calling radio will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh received a compelling reminder of the critical
    importance of communications when a fire at the lager plant damaged the old radio system. “When that happened, power was shut off”, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which
    once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside he recalls. “It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didn’t survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication,
    and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view. “Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and there’s liquid, which radio signals don’t like.”
    What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was simply for a good system. “We had a good look around to see what was out there and “And we were willing to spend the money
    on it. But there was all the additional stuff that it would give us – the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and
    that sort of thing.”

    Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required. But even on its own, the digital radio system
    at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darragh’s opinion. “It’s savage, it’s

    by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to link the two parts. “At the moment you’re standing here”, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger. “There’s a fire station up here and you came in
    at this gate over here. We have a whole other site on the other side of the road. “Product comes in up here and it’s roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here”, he continues,
    his finger tracing paths across the map. “Then it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground to the fermentation plant down here. And that’s our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is
    exported all over the world for canning.” On the control desk, twin screens display the status of radios connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors
    behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently in use on the radio system. Kenwood’s dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard –
    and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick method of exchanging updates without tying up the radio channel. In addition, the software records a complete
    activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the screen, indicating the number of the person who is in trouble. The microphone on the
    calling walkie talkie will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh received a compelling reminder of the critical importance of communications when a fire at
    the lager plant damaged the old radio system. “When that happened, power was shut off”, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside
    he recalls. “It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didn’t survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication, and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view.
    “Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and there’s liquid, which radio signals don’t like.” What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was
    simply for a good system. “We had a good look around to see what was out there and what was the best fit for us”, he explains. “And we were willing to spend the money on it. But there was all the additional stuff
    that it would give us – the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and that sort of thing.”
    Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required.

    But even on its own, the digital radio system at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darragh’s opinion. “It’s savage, it’s by a busy main road, with tunnels beneath to
    link the two parts. “At the moment you’re standing here”, Darragh says, indicating the spot with a finger. “There’s a fire station up here and you came in at this gate over here. We have a whole other
    site on the other side of the road. “Product comes in up here and it’s roasted, fired down a pipe by compressed air to the brewhouse which is just over here”, he continues, his finger tracing paths across the map. “Then
    it goes from the brewhouse, here, underground to the fermentation plant down here. And that’s our kegging line here. And we also have a tank station over here, because the Guinness extract is
    exported all over the world for canning.” On the control desk, twin screens display the status of radios connected to the Nexedge system (this would include any alarms or mandown alerts), and a bank of CCTV monitors
    behind presents an overall view of activity across the site. Four talkgroups are currently in use on the radio system. Kenwood’s dispatcher software also allows text messages to be typed at the keyboard –
    and although this facility is not yet in use, Darragh foresees a future for it as a quick method of exchanging updates without tying up the radio channel.

    In addition, the software records a complete activity history, showing who has called whom, with time and date stamps. If there is an emergency, a red warning will flash on the screen, indicating the number of the person
    who is in trouble. The microphone on the calling radio will then go live. G4S has worked as a contractor at the brewery for more than two years, but Darragh received a compelling reminder of the critical
    importance of communications when a fire at the lager plant damaged the old radio system. “When that happened, power was shut off”, Tracks still lying in the roadways are a relic of the narrow-gauge goods railway which
    once served the 63-acre site. A tunnel, still in use, led them under the street outside he recalls. “It went in the flaking plant as well, and the system didn’t survive it, as such. We ended up with very, very poor radio communication,
    and we were very badly exposed on site from applications point of view. “Coverage around site had been difficult anyway. A lot of the buildings are metal and there’s liquid, which radio signals don’t like.”
    What, then, was the reason for switching to digital? Darragh says the requirement was simply for a good system. “We had a good look around to see what was out there and what was the best fit for us”, he explains.
    “And we were willing to spend the money on it. But there was all the additional stuff that it would give us – the lone worker, the man-down system as well. And there was stuff down along the line that we may be able to
    tap into, such as PABX [interconnect] and that sort of thing.”

    Furthermore, he adds, what works in Dublin could also be repeated at other G4S sites in Ireland, and within other Diageo plants too. The systems could even be interconnected, if required. But even on its own, the digital radio system
    at Guinness, with its improved coverage of the site, has been a revolutionary improvement, in Darragh’s opinion. “It’s savage, it’s

     
  • gerardoberger 9:54 pm on September 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    two Way Radios in Industry Application 

    two way radio use policyWith a great deal of information around the net about 2 way radio uhf vs vhf’s it is hard to find the top and most direct articles. here is a piece of writing from a good site that i believe to be accurate, do not quote me on it but please read and enjoy

    Virtually every industry which needs to communicate with its personnel cost effectively and instantly by voice or data has a requirement for a Kenwood analogue or NEXEDGE® digital two way radio solution, whether in simple peer to peer voice communications or a voice and data enabled trunked network.

    We have attempted to provide a snapshot of some of the most common industry applications, but there are hundreds of others which have yet to be reported from taxi and delivery services to mining, aerospace and forestry.

    If you are an existing user of Kenwood licensed analogue radios or NEXEDGE® digital Earpieces located anywhere in Europe, Middle East or Africa, we would very much like to hear from you to learn how you have put your Kenwood radios to work for your business.

    Please click here to send us an outline of your application story and we will contact you for more details. If we publish your experiences either as one of our Market Sector examples or as a News Story or Case Study, we will present you with two NEXEDGE® digital hand portable walkie talkies of your choice, free of charge, to add to your system. Just for your reassurance if you are currently operating licensed analogue radios, NEXEDGE® digital hand-portable walkie talkies feature Analogue/Digital Mixed Mode which (unlike some other brands) allows them to communicate automatically with existing analogue radios whatever the make; providing a straightforward and economical way to use your existing radios while you upgrade to the benefits of digital.

     
  • gerardoberger 11:45 am on September 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    The various walkie talkies radios 

    I do not know how you came here because you read it on social media, twitter, facebook, google +, stumble upon or somewhere else. thankyou for coming and I trust you take pleasure in reading this as much as I did.

    It is a two Way Radio interaction device that permits security and privateness to the events taking part in communicating with every other particularly the place there is no signifies of obtain to simple interaction.nThe walkie talkies radios can be utilized above lengthy distances in emergencies and in industries. The public transportation sector utilizes walkie talkies radios for communicating among buses, trams and trains. The two-way radios allow autos to effortlessly and instantaneously talk with the hub with out dialing or requesting permission.nnMany walkie talkies radios can be connected to a one frequency. This enables mass communication among many folks with out boundaries. There are many varieties of walkie talkies radios which are accessible nowadays. The analog and electronic units have been used as toys and quick range interaction.nAnalog models usually use a handheld portable unit with a constructed in radio and receiver. This unit can be attached to a belt or held in a pocket when not in use. Many design internet sites and law enforcement departments use this kind of walkie talkies model. Specified walkie talkies radios have been positioned inside of h2o evidence and anti-corrosive casings for underwater use.nnWith improvements in electronics walkie talkies radios have been adapted to employ VHF and HF models for enhanced assortment and high quality. These walkie talkies versions are extremely tiny and can be stored in virtually any compartment. Developments to security have also been created attainable with modern improvements in technology.nThe analog and electronic models occur with embedded protection which stops any unknown units from eavesdropping into a conversation. The big difference in between industrial and consumer walkie talkie designs may differ with characteristics and good quality. The normal selection of a client walkie talkie is considerably lower than far more professional designs.nnThe dimensions of walkie talkies radios will range on these two variables as well. The walkie talkies radios use strong batteries and antenna receivers. The antenna of the walkie talkies radios requirements to be of significant size to pick up acceptable frequencies.nCommercial walkie talkie designs appear with protected casings produced from metallic and aluminum. These designs are h2o resistant and shock proof. nnThe walkie talkies radios are perfect for extended selection constant interaction. It is capable of relaying details obviously and securely. The walkie talkies radios is excellent for outdoor and severe terrain usage.

    If you loved this article so you would like to get more info concerning motorola two way radio generously visit the page.

     
  • gerardoberger 1:58 am on September 13, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Diverse Power Leverages Exalt Backhaul for Large-Scale UHF Walkie Talkie Network 

    augmentative communication device jobsSo to resume my run of content on this blog, I have planned to share one of our favourite posts this week. I was tentative to include it to the website because I really didn’t wish to offend the original author, but I hope he/she is happy that I loved reading their article and wanted to share it with my readers.

    Exalt Communications, Inc., the leading innovator of next-generation wireless connectivity systems for private networks and Internet infrastructures, today announced that Diverse Power, an electric membership cooperative based in La Grange, GA has deployed Exalt ExploreAir microwave backhaul systems to link traffic from its TETRA UHF 2 Way Radio network back to its fiber core.

    With 36,000 customers throughout counties in Georgia and Alabama, Diverse Power’s far-flung operations in this rural area require highly reliable radio communications among its maintenance personnel. Working with Exalt partner Dean’s Commercial Two-Way of Cataula, GA, Diverse Power deployed a TETRA UHF radio system for its workers and selected Exalt ExploreAir microwave backhaul systems to carry traffic among sites in Manchester, Mulberry Grove, and Red Oak, GA.

    “We wanted a first-class system all the way with our radio network, and Dean’s Two Way recommended Exalt for its outstanding performance and reasonable price,” said Randy Shepard, senior vice president of Diverse Power. “Exalt gives us a fiber-speed backhaul infrastructure that we can rely on in all weather conditions, even during the recent ice storms.”

    Diverse Power deployed Exalt ExploreAir systems in all-outdoor configurations on links between Mulberry Grove and Manchester, and between Red Oak and Manchester. The systems carry 100 megabits per-second of Ethernet traffic. While the microwave systems backhaul voice radio traffic today, Diverse Power is looking ahead to carrying SCADA traffic over the links in the future.

    “Fiber and microwave are the only technologies that can reliably backhaul traffic, and Exalt microwave offers customers distinct advantages when expanding a network over a broad geographical area,” said Amir Zoufonoun, CEO of Exalt. “Our systems are scalable, providing customers like Diverse Power the capacity they need to optimize energy delivery, increase productivity, enable two-way information exchange with customers for greater control over their electricity costs, and easily add future service offerings.”

    About Exalt Communications

    Exalt Communications, Inc. is a forerunner in the global Internet revolution, delivering high-value wireless systems that transform the economics of connectivity. Exalt wireless systems extend or complement network fiber and replace now-outdated copper, enabling customers to accelerate time-to-market, optimize network performance, and reduce network infrastructure costs. Today, over 2,000 global customers, from the world’s largest mobile operators to independent service providers, government agencies, and multinational enterprises depend on Exalt systems as they move their applications to the Cloud, enable mobility, and connect the unconnected.

    Read more at http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/Diverse-Power-Leverages-Exalt-Backhaul-for-Large-Scale-UHF-Radio-Network-20140402#VrUcmLhd4WjO3IKs.99

    In the event you liked this informative article and you wish to acquire more info concerning Kenwood radio generously go to our site.

     
  • gerardoberger 3:32 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Chinese radio station fans meet in Erode 

    The basis of this post is to make you consider what in life is essential and what does getting the up-to-date communication device violation really mean to us

    2 way radio nzCOIMBATORE: Pallavi K Paramasivam, a 52-year-old social worker in Perundurai, remembers the first radio he got when he was just 15 years old. He would tune the Motorola radio in all possible ways to reach stations that played Tamil programmes. It was during one such attempt that he received the broadcast of the Tamil service of the Chinese Radio International (CRI). He went on to become such a fan of this radio station and wrote several letters that the station invited him on a two-week trip to China in 1986.

    Paramasivam visited Beijing and Shanghai and tourist spots including The Great Wall of China. When he travelled to China during the 2008 Olympics, CRI helped him find lodging and passes to the games venues. “I was a regular listener of many international radio stations including the Tamil services of BBC, Moscow and Pakistan. But what attracted me to CRI-Tamil service was that they replied to my letters,” he said.

    There are several admirers of the CRI-Tamil service, which started its broadcast in 1963. They are so many in number that came together to set up a listeners’ association in 1986. The association organises listeners’ meets every year, which is attended without fail by members from across the state. Paramasivam, for instance, is a regular at meetings since 1986.

    On Saturday, about 300 listeners attended the 25+t+h CRI-Tamil service listeners meet at Perundurai. Many of them became fans of the radio station by writing letters. Prompt replies from the station ensured that they developed a kind of emotional relationship with the radio station.

    “Last year, the radio announced greetings for my daughter’s marriage,” said S Porunaibalu from Tirunelveli. He started listening to CRI a decade ago after a friend told him about the radio station. His first letter received an enquiry from the local police station. But he was thrilled once he received a reply and from then on sent the station several letters. Even in this internet age, he sends letters by post.

    Zhao Jiang, director of the CRI, says that they receive several thousands of letters from the listeners every year. “This radio service has helped improve ties between the countries and develop an interest in China among the listeners,” she said.

    Interestingly, the listeners appreciate the way the Chinese radio speaks Tamil. “They speak in pure Tamil and the programmes are interesting and their presentation is excellent,” says S Senthilkumar, a Pollachi resident.

    The programmes are predominantly feature stories. They also broadcast news which is, of course, from a Chinese perspective. Some of the listeners said these broadcasts help them understand the Chinese view on issues like Tibet as well as international affairs.
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    Pallavi K Paramasivam, a 52-year-old social worker in Perundurai, remembers the first radio he got when he was just 15 years old.He would tune the radio in all possible ways to reach stations that played Tamil programmes.

     
  • gerardoberger 12:14 pm on September 7, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    You want to connect your workforce as efficiently as possible You expect 

    Thanks for reading my site, here’s an article i actually loved reading. With their permission i can repost it. I compose a lot of my own content, but sporadically repost other articles i find interesting, thankyou for reading.

    Your radios to be affordable but flexible, so they can evolve with you. Now there’s a portable that gives you great voice communications today, and a path to crisp and clear digital voice communications when you’re ready.

    Versatile and powerful, MOTOTRBO™ combines the best of two-way radio functionality with the latest analogue and digital technology. The MOTOTRBO portfolio offers the right device for the right user, from voice-only portables to feature-rich voice and data radios.

    The rugged MOTOTRBO DP1400 is available as an analogue/digital motorola radio that offers all the benefits of the latest technology – from superior audio to greater coverage to longer battery life. This affordable portable

    is compatible with advanced MOTOTRBO features you’ll find are business-essential, for example a transmission can be interrupted to prioritise critical communications.

    MOTOTRBO DP1400 portable RADIO
    You can also choose the analogue-only DP1400 radio and unlock the capabilities of digital when the time is right: all you will need is a simple software upgrade.

    And whichever model you choose, the DP1400 will work seamlessly with the radios you have today.

    Now you can improve the efficiency of your operation with easy-to-use voice communication that’s right for you
    CONNECT AND COORDINATE CREWS

    When you need a simple, reliable, cost-effective communication solution to help multiple work crews connect, coordinate and collaborate, DP1400 two-way portable radios are made to get the job done right. With their easy-to-use ergonomics and crisp, clear audio, now your teams can work more efficiently.

    Unleash the power of your DP1400 radios with Motorola Original® accessories. They’re the only accessories designed, built and tested with your radio to optimise its performance – see the separate DP1400 accessory fact sheet for the full portfolio.

    IMPROVE THE WAY THEY WORK

    A construction worker carries his DP1400 as an essential part of his toolkit. The digital technology gives him excellent coverage across the entire site. And it has significantly better battery life too, so he knows he’ll have reliable voice communications all day long.

    The manufacturing team in a parts factory relies on DP1400 portables to coordinate operations. The radio’s digital noise-cancelling software filters out the worst of the background noise, allowing them to hear clearly over loud machinery. Factory capacity is expanding, so they’re running MOTOTRBO Dual Capacity Direct Mode, which can fit twice as many calls into the same spectrum.

    A security guard uses his DP1400 to alert the control room to some suspicious activity. The radio’s intuitive design is easy to use in the dark, and even when he speaks softly, he knows that the digital AGC (Automatic Gain Control) will automatically boost the volume so he’s heard clearly back in the office. And if it comes to the worst, he can use one of the programmable side buttons to call for help – with one touch.

    MANAGE YOUR FLEET MORE EFFICIENTLY

    We’ve designed the DP1400 to be as efficient to operate as it is cost-effective to buy. That’s why we’ve integrated the powerful fleet management capabilities of Motorola’s Radio Management solution into every radio.

    Gain even greater efficiency when you migrate to digital. Your radio will operate up to 40% longer than analogue on the same battery – and you get twice the capacity from the same 12.5 kHz channel, using our Dual Capacity Direct Mode feature.

    INTEGRATE YOUR DEVICES SEAMLESSLY

    Make sure your new DP1400 The walkie talkies are ready when you are. We can bring together the right experts and processes to help you integrate DP1400 radios into your business, quickly and cost-effectively. This

    includes Coverage Mapping, Site Integration and Device Programming.

    GET DURABILITY THAT ENDURES

    The DP1400 is made to last. It is backed by a two-year standard warranty and a minimum one-year warranty for Motorola-branded accessories. Moreover, the design has been proven tough in Motorola’s unique and gruelling Accelerated Life Test program, in which the radio must survive a simulated 5 years of hard service before it is accepted. In addition, optional Service from the Start provides multi-year peace of mind with fast repair turnaround times, expert telephone technical support and access to the latest software releases2; all backed by Motorola’s globally integrated services infrastructure, highly qualified support technicians and certified repair facilities.

     
  • gerardoberger 1:46 am on September 5, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Do Digital Natives Really Suck at Communicating Face-to-Face 

    The world is stuffed with very cool, well written content. When you find one which catches your eye, you have to repost it, well i do! so with permission of the original author i have re-posted this so that you can take pleasure in

    You grew up texting and friending, so you have demon fast thumbs, a relaxed attitude toward online privacy and a baked in familiarity with the web. In other words, you’re a digital native.

    That’s what a recent post on the HBR blogs by government executive John K. Mullen says, anyway. In it, Mullen warns Millennials that “the internet may have partially rewired your brain in such a way that when you meet people face to face, you’re less capable of figuring out what they’re thinking” because you’re less skilled at picking up verbal and body language clues.

    Research suggests that excessive, long-term exposure to electronic environments is reconfiguring young people’s neural networks and possibly diminishing their ability to develop empathy, interpersonal relations, and nonverbal communication skills. One study indicates that because there’s only so much time in the day, face-to-face interaction time drops by nearly 30 minutes for every hour a person spends on a computer. With more time devoted to computers and less to in-person interactions, young people may be understimulating and underdeveloping the neural pathways necessary for honing social skills. Another study shows that after long periods of time on the internet, digital natives display poor eye contact and a reluctance to interact socially.

    Could this possibly be true? Author Stever Robbins has previously complained about the same phenomenon to me in an interview, saying “there are an awful lot of people under the age of 25 who spend an inordinate amount of time communicating via text and email, and they do it even when they should be working. Get that under control.”

    Robbins cited a young person he worked with who was reluctant to speak in person and constantly wanted to text instead, which Robbins felt stunted their relationship and made him less likely to help advance this young colleague’s career.

    That offers a clue to what might be going on here. Gen Yers shake their heads in disbelief when we’re told we lack empathy because most of us don’t experience our friends and peers as lacking understanding or being frustrating to communicate with. But remember, even if these studies don’t pan out under close examination, and even if your brain is not all that different from your parents’, you still have to interact with older, less digitally immersed generations at work.

    Like Robbins and his young colleague, this can cause a clash of expectations and styles (and maybe even hold back your career). Your brain is just probably fine, but that doesn’t mean you won’t annoy your middle-aged boss if you try to use the same communication style with him that you do with your friends.

    But fret not, both Mullen and Robbins offer tips to help you blend in. Mullen’s emphasis is on learning what older generations expect in terms of face-to-face meetings like interviews. He suggests:

    Your interviewer may be specifically looking for evidence that you’re willing to make eye contact. Engage the interviewer – show a lively interest. This may not come easily.

    Make clear that you understand the importance of face-to-face meetings and that you’re willing to sit down with people. If an interviewer or a questionnaire asks how you’d contact someone in a potentially fraught situation, don’t assume that email is the correct answer.

    Develop empathy, especially if the thought scares you. Commit to spending two weeks without using your cell phone. And without texting and tweeting. Do all of your communications by planning in advance and by meeting up with people and doing face-to-face interactions. If you can’t do that for two weeks to a month, seriously fix that, because it is simply the case that the way human beings are wired, the way relationships get formed is face to face. Relationships do not get formed textually. Very shallow relationships do, but the people you’re going to depend on for big breaks are going to be people you have relationships with and not necessarily the people you tweet with all the time.

    Do you think young people need to train themselves to match the communication expectations of older professionals?

    London-based Jessica Stillman blogs about generational issues and trends in the workforce for Inc.com and GigaOM.

    Brazen Life is a lifestyle and career blog for ambitious young professionals. Hosted by Brazen Careerist, we offer edgy and fun ideas for navigating the changing world of work — this isn’t your parents’ career-advice blog. Be Brazen.

    Here’s What’s Really Holding You Back From Your Dream Career

     
  • gerardoberger 3:58 pm on September 2, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Walkie Talkie Headset 

    two way radio best buyYou might be safe in the knowledge that I bring the top 2 way radio licence posts, a number of which are my very own a number of which are curated by me, when i choose to use someone elses articles it’s because it is relevant to my readership, so feel confident you are reading the best from my industry.

    Walkie Talkies are unique in that the half-duplex channel they operate on will only allow one radio to transmit at any time, though there are no limits to the amount that can listen. Rather than have an earpiece similar to a telephone, they have a built in speaker so the unit does not have to be held to the ear. They are used to connect to both other handheld units and to radio stations which are in a fixed location. The typical shape is of a large telephone handset, with a fixed antenna poking out of the top of the unit.

    There are walkie talkie headsets that come in pairs. Sometimes, these are the models that children want because they would like to play with their friends. This is a bargain for you because you get two headsets for just a price of one. Check also for the sizes of these double headsets. Gauge whether these can be word by children who will eventually play with these. If it means spending the extra dollar for a perfect fit, do so. Walkie talkie headset is such a cool toy to have and your child will have a blast just playing with it.

    Some 2-way radios will go as little as a few hundred feet, which will only cost about ten dollars or so, while others will have long distant ranges, some of up to 10 to 15 miles or so. These may cost a little more, but will be worth it for the clarity and great reception they provide. It is all dependent on each individuals needs. Kids to not need long distance range the majority of the time, but big businesses will.

     
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