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  • gerardoberger 3:55 am on October 14, 1988 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 16   

    2 Way Radios for Stadia 

    2 way radio gps trackingYou are safe in the knowledge that I bring the very best 2 way radio over wifi content pieces, some of which are my own several of which are curated by me, if i choose to use someone elses writing it’s because it’s relevant to my readership, so feel confident that you simply are reading the best from my industry.

    With tens of thousands of people attending individual stadium events for sport and entertainment, the challenges facing management, safety offices and emergency services are both large in scale and complex.

    Reducing the risks of accidents, petty crime, anti-social behaviour, public disorder and even acts of terrorism while managing the efficient flow of spectators, participants, VIPs, vehicles, goods and services at multiple entry and exit points, especially in the event of a major incident, is a major logistical feat.

    In most cases the burden of responsibility to ensure compliance with legislation, best practice and the safety and security of the stadium and those within it falls upon the Stadium Safety Officer. One of the most powerful assets at their disposal in implementating a stadium’s safety and security strategy during events is the ability for all cross functional teams to communicate with each other, their counterparts and the emergency services instantly, reliably and effectively anywhere on site.

    While Kenwood analogue licensed and license-free PMR446 radios have already been proven in service at stadia and events around the world for many years, more and more facilities are upgrading to Kenwood’s NEXEDGE® trunked Digital Two-Way radio solutions to provide clear and reliable multi-user voice and data communications and the flexibility to design a scalable digital radio communications network to suit their range and capacity requirements. NEXEDGE® digital radios additionally feature Analogue/Digital Mixed Mode, which allows them to communicate automatically with any existing analogue radios, whatever the make, to provide a straightforward and economical migration path from analogue to the benefits of advanced digital two way radio communications.

    All NEXEDGE® hand portable walkie talkies additionally conform to MIL-STD-810 C/D/E/F/G for ruggedness and durability and are IP54/55 Water & Dust Intrusion rated, making them ideal for operation in open or harsh environments.

     
  • gerardoberger 9:23 pm on February 21, 1987 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 16   

    Ham Radio Hobby – 5 Facts To Enhance The Fun 

    Thanks for reading my website, here is a piece of writing i actually loved reading. With their consent i’m able to repost it. I write many of my own content, but irregularly repost other articles i find remarkable, thankyou for reading.

    two way radio antenna suppliersIt is usually a custom for the two way communicators to identify their position and station and also their zone, region and place. Should the contact be made for a contest to do as many communication touchups with ham or stations radio operators then this information needs to be shared.

    1. DX-ing and DX-peditions:

    A radio operator’s goal, whether they are an amateur or not, is to get into contact with as many stations as humanly possible throughout the entire world.

    What does DX stand for? It is short for Distant Stations. The second half meaning DX-ing is followed by QSO which means conversation.

    DX-peditions are diverse in that the searching expeditions are intended exclusively for the intention to make contacts. This is especially true for those rare, hard to find and special unrepresentative regions.

    Currently, there are two Way Radio frequency scanners that are great tools for just his use. It will scan repeatedly to find a sting signal.

    2. QSL cards:

    What is a Q code? It is a standard compilation of three letter message indoctrinations that all begin with the letter “Q”. It was first designed for the commercial sector of radiotelegraph communications. Later, it was incorporated to other radio sectors including amateur ones. The “Q” codes are not necessary in today’s transmission age but are used as form of tradition.
    The QSL card, in part with the DX-ing and DX-peditions, is shared. This code means to acknowledge the receipt. it was customary that those who did the initial contact send QSL cards to confirm their contact as well as their conversations. These QSL cards are good for those in a contest to get into contact with a certain amount of stations in the specified amount of time. Not only that, the cards are distinguished because they are efficient for amateur radio operators.

    3. Contacting remote regions:

    For some countries, there are less radio operators and when these are contacted, they are rather special. Many times when a ham radio operators gets into contact with this region, other ham operators seek communications with these operators. When these places are contacted during special times, they have a place for its award program.

    4. Hamfests:

    This is when events are centered on those in the ham family and their friends. This event is designed to sell and exchange ham radios and meet real life ham friends. This event is usually done over the period of a few days.

    5. Ham Radio Discussion Groups

    Like the Internet Chat rooms of today, many ham radio operators offer discussion groups based upon similar interests besides the ham radio. They eventually form networks to help each other out should it be necessary. They can also form a discussion group based on their interests of the ham radio.

    Should a radio hobbyist decides to get involved with the many activities that are involved, they are sure to never be bored. So if this is something you would consider fun and entertaining, then see how you can go about getting started.

    Here is more on The walkie talkie look into our own web page.

     
  • gerardoberger 9:51 am on November 20, 1983 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 16   

    Wireless World War 

    You’ve probably stumbled upon this looking for information about 2 way radio’s, hopefully this will help you answer some of those questions, if not please click on one of the relevant links within the article

    As with so many emerging technologies, it was warfare that helped propel walkie-talkies from prototype to mass adoption in a short time. During World War II, the U.S. and Allied forces were the first to put these newfangled radios into widespread use.

    There were several groups working on this type of radio in the late 1930s, so it’s impossible to attribute the exact genesis of the walkie-talkie to one person or company. Radio engineer Al Gross and Canadian inventor Donald Hings were on the forefront of this technological wave, as were research groups at Gavin Manufacturing Company, which is now better known as Motorola.

    Just before 1940, Motorola produced a portable AM transceiver that became known as a handie talkie. This was an AM-based system (on frequencies from 3 to 6 MHz). It worked, but it was prone to degrading signal quality, meaning static and interference often made communication frustrating.

    The first design to hit the battlefield in mass numbers, and the first to garner the walkie-talkie label, was the Motorola SCR-300. The SCR-300 was also an FM-based device (40 to 48 MHz), and much more resistant to interference than AM. It also had better range, at around 3 to 5 miles (4.8 to 8 kilometers).

    FM-based radio signals offered the advantage of squelch, which just meant that the speaker went silent until an incoming signal arrived. Prior to squelch capabilities, radio operators who monitored AM signals had to endure long periods of mind- and ear-numbing static when no one was transmitting on the channel that they were monitoring.

    The SCR-300 wasn’t exactly as convenient as your average pocket-sized smartphone. It required a backpack that housed the battery, electronics and a 33-inch (84-centimeter) antenna, all of which totaled more than 30 pounds (13.6 kilograms). Try dodging Nazi bullets and bombs with that load on your back.

    In spite of its heft, the unit was rugged and reliable in war zones, and tens of thousands of them were deployed to troops in both the Pacific and European theaters. The end result was forces that could communicate and coordinate their activities much more effectively than ever before.

    After WWII, walkie-talkie technology hit the mainstream. Military versions got smaller, lighter and more powerful. Amateur radio lovers adopted walkie-talkies en masse. Consumer-grade versions appeared, too, with affordable price tags that made them perfect for basic communications around the house, in the field, and even as toys.

    No matter what purpose you use them for, walkie-talkies all work pretty much the same

     
  • gerardoberger 8:32 pm on November 27, 1982 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 16   

    Zello 2 Way Radio Now Allows Users to Mute “on the Fly,” Adds Additional Bug Fixes 

    My basic review of a new article it starts up well, looks quite cool, is simple to run and actually power efficient, the 2 way radio talk codes is a fine product. I’m pleased I bought it, read further beneath.

    Early Saturday, Zello released an update to its two Way Radio application that added a new ability for the user to mute and unmute on the fly. This was the most notable addition to the application and the first addition we’ve seen on Zello in some time (if you don’t count the UI changes that occurred in December).

    In addition to the new mute settings, Zello version 2.44 also fixes a “rare condition” when the recipient receives a notification sound only, but no message. If you’ve experienced this before, let us know if the new version still gives you this issue.

    Zello also fixed the feature that allows users to Talk to all moderators and also included an assortment of additional bug fixes that were not broken down individually, which is normal for most minor updates that are rolled out.

    Read more at http://www.trutower.com/2014/02/10/zello-push-to-talk-app-update-version-244/#8vcUdRe3zQyjLdje.99

    If you have any kind of concerns regarding where and the best ways to use walkie talkie, you can contact us at our own web site.

     
  • gerardoberger 12:43 am on September 27, 1970 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 16   

    two Way Radios for Warehouse Managment 

    Article of the Day………ok so i haven’t got a piece of writing each day, but if i get a chance I’ll post articles that I find interesting. Lucky enough here’s one of these articles that I read and had to share. Should you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of the special social media likes, you know the one which tells one and all that you loved something, rather than you sat on your arse and watched Television!

    walkie talkie detonatorAs a key component in the manufacturing and supply chain processes, warehouse operations, whether in-house or outsourced, have become increasingly critical in business performance not only as a cost centre but also as a means to delivering improved efficiency productivity and customer satisfaction.

    As a global manufacturer of electronics products, we are more than aware of the impact warehouse operations have on the productivity of our manufacturing facilities and distribution centres.

    The free-flow of communications between warehouse management, their staff, production, stores, purchasing, sales teams and customers is vital to keeping production lines moving and the efficient management of component and finished stock inventory where accuracy, speed and detailed reporting are in high demand.

    We designed NEXEDGE® digital two Way Radioo systems to operate efficiently in the difficult environment of a modern warehouse where extensive use of concrete, steel racking, a proliferation of electronics, mechanical handling equipment and great distances can make communications a real challenge, with radio frequency interference and background noise adding to the mix.

    Kenwood’s NEXEDGE® peer to peer and trunked digital two-way radios and walkie talkie solutions have been proven in the most demanding manufacturing and distribution warehouse operations around the world, including our own.

    Among its many benefits, NEXEDGE® Digital Two-Way walkie-talkies and in-vehicle units additionally feature an Analogue/Digital Mixed Mode which allows them to communicate automatically with any existing analogue radios whatever the make; providing a straightforward and economical way to use existing radios while migrating to the benefits of digital without compromising service quality and reliability.

    All NEXEDGE® hand portable walkie talkies conform to MIL-STD-810 C/D/E/F/G for ruggedness and durability and are IP54/55 Water & Dust Intrusion rated, making them ideal for operation in harsh environments.

    If you have any questions regarding wherever and how to use motorola radio, you can call us at our own web-page.

     
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