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  • gerardoberger 3:19 am on March 25, 1990 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    2 Way Radios for Ports 

    So i discovered this article on the net and i heard that just posting it as the whole piece is not an excellent thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up the way to curate content, so this is it…….i thought this was fascinating as it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working in the business.

    two way radio quad packThe global shipping industry expanded to revenues of over 8 billion by the end of 2008, growing at an average of 10% per year. The industry employs around 1.6 million people and some 8 billion tons of freight is handled each year through sea ports.

    The emergence of new economies bringing strong demand for commodities matched to worldwide demand for cheaper manufactured goods has fuelled the growth of shipping as the most cost effective method to transport goods, accounting for some 90% of goods traded between countries.

    Modern sea ports play a key role in the development of the global economy and service, not just geography, has become the driver to attracting traffic.

    As port terminal operations have become more complex, with logistics, inventory controls, “just-in-time” service and sophisticated container tracking systems, so too has the need to maximise efficiency.

    Clear reliable voice and data communication between port management and their many teams plays a pivotal role in delivering operational efficiency and improved safety and security; not easy across large areas with containers and mechanical handling equipment interfering with radio signals.

    Kenwood’s analogue and digital two Way Radio systems have been selected by some of the most modern ports in the world including Mersin International Port, Turkey and PSA International Port, Vietnam where they are deployed to enhance the flow of cargo by reducing the incidence of bottlenecks, while ensuring the safety of staff and the security of the facility.

    More recently, Kenwood NEXEDGEŽ Digital Two-Way radio systems employing walkie-talkies and in-vehicle mobile units (which feature an Analogue/Digital Mixed Mode allowing them to communicate automatically with any existing analogue radios whatever the make) have increasingly proven to be the right choice for customers seeking a straightforward and economical way to use their existing analogue fleet while migrating to the benefits of digital without compromising service quality and reliability.

    All NEXEDGEŽ hand portable walkie talkies conform to MIL-STD-810 C/D/E/F/G for ruggedness and durability and are IP54/55 Water & Dust Intrusion rated, making them ideal for operation in harsh environments.

     
  • gerardoberger 7:03 am on August 20, 1986 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    Mini two Way Radios 

    Without giving too much about this communication devices teach ict piece, but I thought it interesting and relevant to what I’m currently doing.

    Small Walkie-Talkies are no more something which only children accustomed to enjoy. It’s advanced significantly from as being a toy and it is now considered a really helpful otherwise an important requirement by some families and organisations.

    Walkie-Talkies use wireless signals that contact another walkie-talkie products on the limited range which is something that you might want to see which can can also include things like the Motorola CP040 which is quite small and means that you can enjoy it wherever you may be. It becomes very essential in patrols, drills, office issues which is a fun factor to enjoy, throughout outside picnics or treks.

    Models like Motorola provide a more severe packaging however, still other models like Freetalker offer them by means of wrist watches which in some way become extremely important when jumpy teens are come to crowded public areas. This brand also customises the regularity range according to customer demands.

    It’s possible to begin using these small walkie-talkies individually or with some earphones. These may usually be utilized up to some radius of six kms however, that could alternation in real-time environment conditions which is quite similar to what we know as a Walkie Talkie and how this can help us out here. These mobile products are highly reliable as a number of them are recognized to work forever for 2 days at a time, due to a choice of auto battery saving mode.

    A really trendy searching walkie-talkie can be obtained using the Lengthy-range versions. It’s a FRS small walkie-talkie with really low output energy. The push to speak function guarantees that certain doesn’t have to fumble within the talk button and also the scan, call and alert feature helps even much more. It spans over twenty-two channels, which vary basis locations, and like the majority of other items of the genre, it features a selection of about five kms. The built-in Brought torch also is available in handy at nighttime.

    As talked about briefly earlier, the Motorola talkabout EM 1000 R is really a more severe kinda and it is not only due to its cost. It’s some advanced features, which causes it to be well suited for professional usage and also just using a walkie talkie for everyday business and not think about other things that you dont really need to worry about. It features a selection of twenty miles, and it has emergency alert systems. On activation from the alert button, radio stations sends a siren that’s then sounds and these instantly alert other walkie-talkies within the range. The iVOX also works because the speaker, which guarantees that you simply enjoy continuous signal even when you’re not able to apply your hands. The truly amazing part relating to this method is that, it’s eleven weather channels which helps someone to be up to date with any weather changes which has the chance of stifling a trek or perhaps a trip.

     
  • gerardoberger 8:29 pm on August 23, 1985 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    With the help of friends in government, Motorola achieves telecom supremacy 

    So to carry on my run of articles on this website, I have planned to share one of my favorite content pieces this week. I used to be hesitant to add it to the website because I really did not want to offend the initial writer, but I hope he/she is happy that I enjoyed reading their work and planned to share it with my readers.

    After communication breakdowns contributed to the deaths of 125 New York firefighters on Sept. 11, 2001, the nation spent tens of billions of dollars making public safety radios more compatible, no matter their brand.

    The vast majority of those tax dollars landed at the feet of Motorola. The market leader for years has held an iron grip over pricing power for the gadgets that let police, firefighters and other first responders talk during emergencies.

    That spending has delivered some public benefit. Nearly a decade after a commission’s report, radio connections have improved. New York’s networks, for example, performed well after Hurricane Sandy last year.

    Kansas City’s Metropolitan Area Regional two Way Radio System is known as a sparkling success story in the nation’s push for seamless communication among public safety workers.

    The metrowide system’s 2012 upgrade for 24,000 workers is also but one example of how, in domino-like fashion, Motorola leveraged one contract to land the next and the next.

    Meanwhile, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security sees a national system riddled with too many weak signals and fragmented frequencies. The push to resolve such issues with competitively priced upgrades has moved at a snail’s pace.

    A McClatchy investigation over seven months found that in one region after another, city, county and state officials favored Motorola, helping the firm secure an estimated 80 percent of all the emergency telecommunications business in America.

    In a 2011 report, Congress’ investigative arm, the Government Accountability Office, warned that government agencies may be overpaying for radios because they “lack buying power in relationship to device manufacturers.”

    From the nation’s capital to the Midwest to the Pacific Coast, government officials have handed the company noncompetitive contracts, used modifications of years-old contracts to acquire new systems or crafted bid specifications to Motorola’s advantage.

    Those officials, perhaps without recognizing their collective role, helped stunt the very competition needed to hold down prices.

    In a weakly policed but humongous patchwork of as many as 20,000 city, county, state and federal two-way radio networks, governments have paid as much as $7,500 apiece for Motorola models. They paid those prices even while some competitors offered products meeting the same specifications for a fraction of the cost.

    In Europe, albeit with a lower-power network that requires more costly towers and infrastructure, police radios serving the same functions sell for $500 to $700.

    Motorola’s contract wins have been clouded by irregularities or allegations of government favoritism in Chicago, Dallas and the San Francisco Bay Area and on statewide systems in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas and Washington, to name a few. Losing bidders often have been left chafing with the belief that they weren’t playing on a level field.

    State officials in Kansas bypassed state competitive bidding requirements in 2005 with an unusual modification of a 1991 contract with Motorola — one providing for a new, $50 million digital system. State officials defended their action by arguing that competitive bids were taken on the original system 14 years earlier.

    In Chicago, city officials justified a noncompetitive, $23 million contract on the grounds it would protect a $2 million investment in proprietary Motorola equipment. The city’s inspector general found the equipment’s actual value was $350,000.

    Between 2009 and 2011, the state of Iowa issued five solicitations for radio bid prices that each favored Motorola, one requiring that two knobs on the radios be exactly 19 millimeters apart — a parameter fitting only a Motorola radio, The Des Moines Register first reported.

    “While our public safety people do an extraordinary job in protecting the public, I am not impressed with the choices they’ve made relative to technology,” said Democratic Rep. Anna Eshoo of California, who represents part of Silicon Valley and has for years monitored Motorola’s dominance with chagrin.

    She called radio prices of $5,000 and above “ludicrous.”

    Industry dominator

    Illinois-based Motorola Solutions, as its public safety arm has been called since Motorola Inc. split in two in 2011, declined to make its chief executive, Gregory Brown, available for an interview. Nor would the company respond to detailed questions submitted by McClatchy.

    Instead, Motorola issued a statement saying that it has developed “state-of-the-art technology to support the challenging and demanding missions of public safety” for more than 80 years.

    “Customers choose Motorola because we have remained committed to serving these dedicated professionals by closely listening to them and responding with innovative solutions that meet their needs,” it said.

    Yet McClatchy’s investigation found that:

    • Even after uniform design standards for two-way radios took hold in 2005, Motorola found ways to elbow rivals out of some markets by peddling proprietary extras that don’t interact with non-Motorola radios, such as special encryption software sold for a few dollars per radio in states including Kansas and Missouri.

    • Many cities and counties have awarded Motorola sole source contracts by using “cooperative contracts” that piggyback on deals that Motorola won competitively elsewhere. In 2011, financially distressed Fort Worth, Texas, and Washington, D.C., each handed Motorola a $50 million deal by adopting pricing from a Houston-Galveston area regional contract.

    • Auditors who track grants from the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies have given little scrutiny to state and local officials who tilt procurements toward Motorola, including those who ignore requirements that its radios fully interact with other brands.

    Motorola’s rugged two-way radios, able to survive a dropped bowling ball or submersion in a tank of water, have for decades set the standard for performance in the emergency communications market.

    “You’ll never get fired for buying Motorola,” goes the saying.

    The company usually has held a technological edge over competitors, even if its digital radios were plagued by some of the same failures as its rivals in recent years. Those glitches have been blamed for contributing to the deaths of at least five firefighters nationwide.

    In addition, the company’s longstanding marketing of proprietary features in its systems has clashed head-on with the national goal of interoperability. Fire commanders in some cities, for instance, carried multiple radios to multi-alarm blazes to ensure they could talk with every unit dispatched to the scene.

    John Powell, a former chairman of a National Public Safety Telecommunications Council panel on the subject, said that even today “we’ve got these systems going in with federal grant dollars that are really being a detriment to interoperability.”

    Powell criticized federal agencies for failing to put enough “teeth in those grant guidance documents” to ensure against proprietary features, such as Motorola’s encryption.

    It is rare that a single company wields such power over a multibillion-dollar industry, especially one financed solely by taxpayers.

    “Motorola is, in practical terms, a monopoly, and they control the market for the purpose of keeping the pricing very high,” said Jose Martin, president of Power Trunk, a subsidiary of a Spanish firm, Teltronic, which is trying to break into the U.S. public safety radio market.

    Motorola stressed in its statement that it was “an early participant” in the 25-year-old industry-government effort to develop design standards, known as Project 25, or P25, that are supposed to open competition to all comers.

    Martin, however, contended that Motorola pushed for P25 standards so the United States wouldn’t fall under Europe’s similar uniform manufacturing standard for emergency radios.

    As a result, Martin said, “U.S. taxpayers are being exfoliated.”

    A hold on Kansas City

    Some 3,600 police, firefighters and emergency medical workers in Kansas City had relied since 1993 on a network installed by General Electric Corp.

    The company’s public safety radio business was ultimately bought by the Harris Corp., Motorola’s biggest rival.

    Like public safety agencies in most large cities, those in the Kansas City area have shifted in the last few years to the P25 common standards designed to prevent use of proprietary features that can freeze out competition.

    When bids went out for a total system replacement, however, Motorola had the upper hand.

    Johnson County had just bought a new system from the company and one of its multimillion-dollar master controllers, essentially the network’s pulse, said Ed Brundage, manager of the Kansas City Police Department’s radio system.

    While the radios meet P25 standards, he said, the standards still weren’t sufficient to ensure full communication between controllers, or switches, made by different manufacturers.

    In addition, Independence also had acquired a new Motorola system in 2007.

    That made Motorola the preferable contractor, Brundage said, though a more limited arrangement was still possible with Harris.

    Motorola narrowly won the $39 million contract over Harris, the only other bidder, for service to Kansas City, Gladstone, Riverside and North Kansas City.

    Including equipment purchased by suburban communities, Brundage estimated the entire cost of the metro area’s radio upgrade at $80 million to $100 million.

    Kansas City was able to upgrade 4,000 Harris radios to the P25 standard with new software while buying 2,500 new radios, with the 3,600 handsets for public safety agencies averaging $3,500 each, Brundage said.

    When Cass and Wyandotte counties come aboard, six of the metro area’s nine counties will have joined the network, covering about 95 percent of the area’s population, he said.

    Despite plaudits the system has received, there has been a downside to Motorola’s dominance.

    In Kansas City’s suburbs, Motorola has embedded inexpensive, proprietary encryption features in its systems that can complicate the push for interoperability.

    Last year, Independence and Blue Springs elected to use Motorola’s encryption product to secure day-to-day police communications, not just for radio exchanges during major manhunts or sensitive investigations.

    That handed Motorola a marketing edge.

    Keith Faddis, director of the public safety radio program for the Mid-America Regional Council, said the agency has tried to limit the damage by requiring that every radio is programmed to regional talk groups where the encryption feature won’t work.

    But Gary Light, sales manager for KC Wireless Inc., which sells radios made by another Motorola rival as well as some Motorola models, said that police chiefs of some towns said they were told by colleagues: “If you want to communicate with us, you are going to buy Motorola with ADP.”

    Jim Ross, police chief in Lake Tapawingo in Jackson County, said he felt compelled to heed that advice and bought seven handsets and car radios.

    “We’re all in the same boat.”

    Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2014/03/29/4924583/with-the-help-of-friends-in-government.html#storylink=cpy

     
  • gerardoberger 12:10 am on October 22, 1982 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    What is Ham Radio & How Does it Work 

    Some of these professional writers on the internet are at a really top level that i wonder if any of them have ever written a paperback? well now and then i like to spotlight these brilliant articles and here’s one i found remarkable the other day.

    Ham radio (so called because its operators were originally derided as being ‘hammy’ in the 19th century, when the technology first emerged) is a term that applies to any form of amateur radio broadcasting.

    There are designated radio frequency spectra available solely for public use. Uses range from recreation to communication and the non-commercial exchange of ideas. ‘Hams’ take advantage of these frequencies in order to transmit any number of things

    Strictly speaking, there should not be any money involved in amateur radio (hence the term ‘amateur’). Although the majority of Ham radio practitioners are actually extremely knowledgeable about radio technology (don’t let the ‘ham’ part fool you), they are not considered professionals because they do not profit from their endeavours. Conversely, commercial broadcasting involves (a lot of) money: royalties are paid, producers and performers are paid and the whole thing is ultimately a commercial exercise.

    Hams use a large amount of frequency bands from all across the radio spectrum, but the majority of frequencies are to be found just above the AM band.

    A lot of hams, however, use VHF FM, operating hand-held transceivers that send on one frequency and receive on another. Local radio clubs set up FM Repeaters (which borrow space from other broadcast devices such as towers and, in doing so, amplify the radio signal’s strength hundreds of times over), so that hams can communicate with each other wirelessly over a distance of hundreds of miles.

    As an example of what hams get up to, here’s an excerpt from Gary Brown, of ‘How Stuff Works.com’

    “Although a ham two Way Radio does broadcast in all directions, hams generally do not use their radios in a broadcast kind of way as a disk jockey would at a radio station. In normal AM or FM radio, one disk jockey transmits and thousands of people listen. Hams, on the other hand, conduct two-way conversations, often with another ham or with a group of hams in an informal roundtable. The roundtable of hams may be in the same town, county, state, country or continent or may consist of a mix of countries, depending on the frequency and the time of the day. Hams also participate in networks, often called nets, at predetermined times and frequencies to exchange third-party messages. In the case of disasters, hams exchange health and welfare information with other hams”.

    To become a ham, I recommend that you join a club. You’ll need an amateur radio license, of course, but this won’t break the bank, I’m sure.

    I hope that helps, Melissa.

    If you beloved this short article and you would like to acquire much more details about The walkie talkie kindly go to our own web site.

     
  • gerardoberger 2:21 pm on August 28, 1982 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    two Way Radios for Stadiums 

    So ladies and gentlemen, i’ve a different brilliant walkie talkie on sale piece of writing for you to read, i know, you don’t need to thank me each and every one, just click a social like to the short article to illustrate your appreciation.

    With tens of thousands of people attending individual stadium events for sport and entertainment, the challenges facing management, safety offices and emergency services are both large in scale and complex.

    Reducing the risks of accidents, petty crime, anti-social behaviour, public disorder and even acts of terrorism while managing the efficient flow of spectators, participants, VIPs, vehicles, goods and services at multiple entry and exit points, especially in the event of a major incident, is a major logistical feat.

    In most cases the burden of responsibility to ensure compliance with legislation, best practice and the safety and security of the stadium and those within it falls upon the Stadium Safety Officer. One of the most powerful assets at their disposal in implementating a stadium’s safety and security strategy during events is the ability for all cross functional teams to communicate with each other, their counterparts and the emergency services instantly, reliably and effectively anywhere on site.

    While Kenwood analogue licensed and license-free PMR446 radios have already been proven in service at stadia and events around the world for many years, more and more facilities are upgrading to Kenwood’s NEXEDGEŽ trunked Digital Two-Way radio solutions to provide clear and reliable multi-user voice and data communications and the flexibility to design a scalable digital radio communications network to suit their range and capacity requirements. NEXEDGEŽ digital radios additionally feature Analogue/Digital Mixed Mode, which allows them to communicate automatically with any existing analogue radios, whatever the make, to provide a straightforward and economical migration path from analogue to the benefits of advanced digital two way radio communications.

    All NEXEDGEŽ hand portable walkie talkies additionally conform to MIL-STD-810 C/D/E/F/G for ruggedness and durability and are IP54/55 Water & Dust Intrusion rated, making them ideal for operation in open or harsh environments.

     
  • gerardoberger 12:15 pm on August 27, 1982 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    Motorola DP 3400 Two way radio Review 

    The world is filled with very cool, well written content pieces. Whenever you find one which catches your eye, you have got to repost it, well i do! so with permission of the original writer i have re-posted this to take pleasure in

    We are grateful to be able to review the Motorola DP3400 2 way radio, this has been on the market for a while, but over the last few years you would have seen this radio used in many shopping centres, office buildings and venues across the UK.

    THE SPECS

    There’s quite a lot that makes the DP 3400 more than just another two-way radio. For a start, the DP3400 employs a single-site trunking solution that can allow over a thousand users to share information, and even data, with each other, without adding new frequencies.

    The DP 3400 2 Way Radio also comes complete with an emergency button, this button, when pushed, automatically alerts the supervisor (or dispatcher) to any possible trouble without the user having to speak even a single word. Such a safety feature works in tandem with the DP 3400’s ‘Emergency Signalling’ capability, a function that will send an emergency signal to a pre-determined person or group.

    The DP 3400 is capable of signal migration for both analogue and digital signals; it easily (and handily) combines traditional radio technology with cutting edge digital methods.
    The radio comes in both UHF (4w) and VHF (5w).

    This model also comes with a cradle that charges your battery for you, it is an excellent charger, representing an efficient design and complete user-friendliness.

    THE PRICE

    This is a neat little gizmo, but Motorola know that. The price of £350 might seem a little steep at first, but if its professional quality you’re after, then you should be prepared to pay a professional price.

    THE PERFORMANCE

    Despite having a decidedly utilitarian feel overall, the outer design actually benefits from a softer, ‘sanded down’ finish. With smoother edges and a more contemporary feel, this two-way radio doesn’t seem as Spartan as a more military or security-centric model might. It provides all the same functions, but the end result is a little bit more aesthetically pleasing and somehow more reassuring. In short, this model will be better for business.

    The brightly lit buttons are also very useful if you’re using the radio at night. It’s a Tricolour LED, so the lights appear modern and pleasing.

    This is a very tough little device, with a sturdy outer casing and what appears to be shock proofing all the way around. The body of this radio is so well sealed that not even a particle of dust or grit can penetrate it. It can even be fully submerged in water for 30 minutes without succumbing to permanent damage.

    The belt clip is sturdy and holds the radio to your belt so well, that you never fear it will fall off. You also get a dust cover, which protects the open accessory port in the event that you aren’t using any accessories. This is a welcome feature that is always nice to see. The addition of programmable side buttons is also a very welcome feature of the DP 3400.

    The DP 3400 also benefits greatly from a very long battery life, which is ideal for outdoor work.

    THE VERDICT

    This is a marvellous radio. It is suitable for any number of events/functions. The sound comes through clearly, the large microphone/speaker setup allows for ease of use and the entire package is exceptionally well made. The DP 3400 is smart, user friendly and very high quality.

    The only knock I’d give it is that the battery, although excellently designed, is somewhat heavy. That’s it.

    However, I still think that the aforementioned episode of ‘Spaced’ would have gone a lot more smoothly if they’d invested in a couple of these little beauties.

    The impressive Motorola DP3400 radio can be found on this website 2wayradionline.co.uk

    When you have any queries regarding where by along with the way to employ Icom radio, you possibly can call us in our own website.

     
  • gerardoberger 1:25 am on April 19, 1981 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    Two way radio Basics 

    What would you do if i stated I had found a two way radio of carolina article that is not only interesting but informative also? I knew you would not believe me, so here it is the educational, excellent and fascinating editorial

    Which is better UHF or VHF? UHF offers the best coverage and penetration inside buildings or outdoors. VHF is fine in flat open areas or around wood structures.

    How much power do I need? Power is a major factor in achieving the range and coverage in a particular structure as well as providing a clear, crisp signal that is easy to understand. Coverage is improved when power is increased.

    How many Channels do I need? One channel per work group is typical. Use multi-channels when separating multiple workgroups. Examples: Managers, shipping, manufacturing, maintenance, security, general and sub contractors, different departments such as stock, customer service, etc.

    Do current Motorola two way radios talk to older models and other brands? Yes, as long as the frequencies and codes match.

    How many two-way radios can be used together? There is not limit.

    How rugged are Motorola two-way radios? These radios are built rugged for business and meet Motorola’s accelerated life testing including a 5 foot drop to concrete on all sides.

    Can they be used with repeaters and base stations? CLP, RDU 4 Watt, RDV 5 Watt and AX models are dealer programmable to work with repeaters and base stations. See page 8 for Range Extender/Repeater.

    Inexpensive FRS/GMRS Walkie-Talkies
    While recreational models are inexpensive, their cost to use is 2 – 4 times greater than business models over time. Units and batteries are replaced often. GMRS requires FCC license just as business models, but are not legal to businesses, violators subject to fines.

    Range & Coverage
    Most business users need to communicate “on-site” in and around their structures. Coverage of their facility with a clear, intelligible signal is the primary concern. Wide area coverage of several miles may require use of a “repeater”. HP Series radios are compatible with repeaters.

    Range is determined by several factors:

    UHF provides the best coverage indoors and out, especially in steel and concrete structures and large industrial or multi-story buildings. A 2 watt UHF will provide better coverage inside industrial buildings than a 5 watt VHF.

    VHF is good for outdoor “line of sight” applications and inside wood structures

    Power More power provides greater coverage and penetration

    Obstructions Structures, metal, steel and concrete reduce range and coverage

     
  • gerardoberger 1:58 am on February 21, 1979 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    2 way radio For Secure And Safe Communication! 

    Without giving too much about this communication devices that rely on electromagnetic radiation to work piece of writing, but I found it remarkable and appropriate to what I’m now doing.

    Walkie talkie radios are a great communication device, which help us keep in touch all the time and during any weather condition. They are more efficient than cell phones. Walkie talkie radios can even work in severe storms as the signals are very strong and the speaker of these radios is very loud and clear. Where security and safety is vital, walkie talkie radios are the best choice.

    Using a Walkie Talkie Radio

    It is very simple to use a walkie talkie radio. It is a push-to-talk device that allows you to listen while the other speaks. The button when pushed allows the transmission of voice from one walkie talkie to another. Due to the presence of a speaker, you can easily address even a group of people. For the radios to be in sync, they need to be set at the same frequency.

    With the development of digital two-way radios, transmission of messages from both the speaker and the receiver has been possible just like cell phones. This is possible through two different radio frequencies transmitted at the same time from both ends.

    Advantages of Using A Digital Walkie Talkie System

    * Exceptional sound clarity

    * Reduction in noise and sound interference

    * Cost-effective

    * Extra features like GPS, text also provided

    * Can function in both settings–digital and analogue

    • Digital two-way radio batteries are more efficient and work for a longer time period than analogue ones

    Two-way radio accessories like batteries, headset, and the case are also easily available online and at a reasonable price. They are as easily available as a laptop battery or any other electronic product in the market. If you intend to increase the efficiency of your business, buy walkie talkies (digital two-way systems) that are a more secure means of communication as well.

    Buying Walkie Talkie Radios

    We see many online advertisements where two-way radios for sale. However, we should take care of certain things before choosing the one for our use.

    • Usage purpose: The purpose for which a Icom walkie talkie is to be used should be very clear. This will help us in choosing the right model. If the usage is for official purpose, you should choose a licensed model; if it is just for fun and casual activities, an unlicensed model will serve the purpose.
    • Features required: The distance that is required for communication is also a factor along with the coverage area, which is essential for its usage. Tall buildings and hills can affect the transmission of signals. So, these things should be kept in mind.
    • Accessories available: Accessories like chargers, battery, and adaptor are equally important while choosing a walkie talkie radio. They also determine the efficiency of the device when put to use.

    Walkie talkie radios are useful both outdoor and indoor activities. Nowadays, they are a popular choice for businesses as a secure and assured means of communication.

     
  • gerardoberger 4:48 am on April 12, 1972 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    Stadia with Kenwood Nexedge Walkie Talkie 

    What is your favourite feature of my xact 2 way radio? In my opinion, I like the design job – Its cooler than an Inuit’s underpants!

    With tens of thousands of people attending individual stadium events for sport and entertainment, the challenges facing management, safety offices and emergency services are both large in scale and complex.

    Reducing the risks of accidents, petty crime, anti-social behaviour, public disorder and even acts of terrorism while managing the efficient flow of spectators, participants, VIPs, vehicles, goods and services at multiple entry and exit points, especially in the event of a major incident, is a major logistical feat.

    In most cases the burden of responsibility to ensure compliance with legislation, best practice and the safety and security of the stadium and those within it falls upon the Stadium Safety Officer. One of the most powerful assets at their disposal in implementating a stadium’s safety and security strategy during events is the ability for all cross functional teams to communicate with each other, their counterparts and the emergency services instantly, reliably and effectively anywhere on site.

    While Kenwood analogue licensed and license-free PMR446 radios have already been proven in service at stadia and events around the world for many years, more and more facilities are upgrading to Kenwood’s NEXEDGEŽ trunked Digital Two-Way radio solutions to provide clear and reliable multi-user voice and data communications and the flexibility to design a scalable digital radio communications network to suit their range and capacity requirements. NEXEDGEŽ digital radios additionally feature Analogue/Digital Mixed Mode, which allows them to communicate automatically with any existing analogue radios, whatever the make, to provide a straightforward and economical migration path from analogue to the benefits of advanced digital two way radio communications.

    All NEXEDGEŽ hand portable walkie talkies additionally conform to MIL-STD-810 C/D/E/F/G for ruggedness and durability and are IP54/55 Water & Dust Intrusion rated, making them ideal for operation in open or harsh environments.

     
  • gerardoberger 6:14 am on July 25, 1971 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 20   

    Two Japanese airlines to disregard China air zone rules 

    So i found this post on the internet and i was told that just posting it as the whole piece isn’t the best thing, I got consent from the original writer and read up how to curate content, so that is it…….i thought this was fascinating as it highlights some of the highs and lows that I encountered when i was working in the business.

    Two of Japan’s biggest airlines have agreed to abide by a government request not to implement China’s new air defence zone rules, officials say.

    All Nippon Airlines and Japan Airlines say that they will stop filing flight plans demanded by China on routes through the zone, set up on Saturday.

    Japan says that China’s new air defence identification zone are “not valid at all” and should be disregarded.

    Singapore Airlines and Qantas have said that they will abide by the new rules.

    Disputed islands
    The new zone created by China covers disputed East China Sea waters.

    Map of east china sea and declared air defence zone
    Both All Nippon Airlines (ANA) and Japan Airlines have been informing China’s aviation authorities of flights through it since the weekend.

    But the two airlines now say that they will stop doing so from Wednesday.

    The zone includes disputed islands known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China. Taiwan also claims the islands, which are controlled by Japan.

    Part of the zone also overlaps with a submerged rock claimed by South Korea.

    China says aircraft entering the zone must obey its rules, which include providing a flight plan, maintaining two Way Radio communications and clearly identifying their nationality.

    Aircraft who ignore the rules would be subject to “defensive emergency measures”, China’s Defence Ministry had said.

    ‘Not valid’
    Japan has condemned the establishment of the zone as illegal, with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Monday calling it a “dangerous” act.

    Continue reading the main story
    Air defence identification zones

    Zones do not necessarily overlap with airspace, sovereign territory or territorial claims
    States define zones, and stipulate rules that aircraft must obey; legal basis is unclear
    During WW2, US established an air perimeter and now maintains four separate zones – Guam, Hawaii, Alaska, and a contiguous mainland zone
    UK, Norway, Japan and Canada also maintain zones
    Source: aviationdevelopment.org

    On Tuesday, Japanese Transport Minister Akihiro Ota said China’s zone declaration was “not valid at all” and that Japanese airlines should not follow its stipulations.

    Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida said officials would be keeping communications open with airlines.

    “I believe it is important for the public and private sectors to co-operate in showing China our firm resolve,” he said.

    Continue reading the main story
    China-Japan disputed islands

    The archipelago consists of five uninhabited islands and three reefs
    Japan, China and Taiwan claim them; they are controlled by Japan and form part of Okinawa prefecture
    Japanese businessman Kunioki Kurihara owned three of the islands but sold them to the Japanese state in September 2012
    The islands were also the focus of a major diplomatic row between Japan and China in 2010
    Q&A: China-Japan islands row
    Singapore Airlines and Australia’s Qantas, as well as civil aviation officials from Hong Kong, Taiwan and South Korea said on Monday they would be informing Chinese officials of flights, Reuters news agency reported.

    China’s move has drawn criticism from several nations, including South Korea which claims a rock in the area.

    “I’d like to say once again that we have unchanging territorial control over Ieodo,” Defence Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok said on Monday.

    Meanwhile, Australia summoned the Chinese ambassador on Tuesday to express opposition over the zone.

    “The timing and the manner of China’s announcement are unhelpful in light of current regional tensions, and will not contribute to regional stability,” Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said in a statement.

    “Australia has made clear its opposition to any coercive or unilateral actions to change the status quo in the East China Sea.”

    The US has also hit out at the move, with Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel calling it a “destabilising attempt to alter the status quo in the region”.

    China says the zone is aimed at defending its sovereignty.

    Source – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-25087793

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